ALLIANCE MARXIST-LENINIST (NORTH AMERICA:

Submission to Third Conference of International Struggle Marxist-Leninist. October 1999; Paris.
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THE NATIONAL QUESTION IN THE ERA OF GLOBALISATION.

Goal Of This Article

We intend to discuss the most important features of imperialism as defined by Lenin; to ask whether the essential features of capital are so changed by recent events that we must revise the importance of the National Question and the general call of Communists to support the national movement:

What this meant for Marxist-Leninists in relation to colonial and dependent countries, was explained by Lenin and Stalin: What Is Globalisation? Definitions and Our Analytic Task

An acceptable working definition of "Globalisation" is needed for this analysis. It should be one that assumes the normal current position about "globalisation", and makes the link between the "eclipse" of nations and "globalisation" explicit. The left leaning Hugo Radice (we assume him to be a social democrat) offers this:

Of course, as Radice points out, "international transactions" have taken place well before the advent of industrial capitalism. After all international trade is at least as old as the Phoenicians. The term "globalisation" is meant to imply a wider and deeper phenomena.

If that is so, what are the claims for a qualitatively new situation in the world economy, based upon?

It seems to be agreed by ideologists of the business and capitalist houses as well as the social democrat "left-leaning" like Radice, that a key element is an "inter-penetration" of business interests around the world. Thus, John H. Dunning is a fervent supporter of what he and others term the new era of "Alliance Capitalism" in today's world economy. He adopts the definition of Antony McGrew from the work "Globalization & the Nation State"; 1992:

Dunning then makes the general definition operational and explicit in relation to the needs of big business: Whether any of this is "new", is assessed below. But, for now, the link for these ideologists with the role of the nation state is explored. What do these definitions mean for the individual nation-state? For the proponents of "globalization", to enhance "value-adding" activity, all countries must be "fully open" to the forces of international globalization: Well what does this mean?

There is little doubt that at the simplest level it is a demand for free entry of goods and services and capital across all borders. Indeed an explicit anti-protectionism call. But beyond this, is intended a further dimension the actual erosion of independent nations. As always, to assuage the fears of the "overly-anxious" capital calls upon trusted ideologues to clear the way and provide their "rationale". The ex-Communist Eric J Hobsbawm, is given accolades by the bourgeoisie for his historical analyses. He presents the viewpoint of the bourgeoisie on the matter of "nationalism in the 20the Century":

Hobsbawm has filled the need of capital for a progressive patina-veneer to cover Capital's worst aims with a "rationale". This matches well the view of the more openly pro-bourgeois-capitalist ideologues like Lester C. Thurow, the former Dean of MIT Sloan School of Management. Thurow has no bones about concurring with the sense of Hobsbawm: In agreement that there has been a diminishment of nation-states, are key progressive forces actively fighting back against the impacts of global capital. For example, in colourful and vivid language, "Sub-Commandante Marcos" echoes the overall analysis. Although Marcos wrongly identifies the "Cold War" as the "Third World War", and also wrongly identifies the Castro and Khruschev regimes (among others) as socialist - Nonetheless his perspective is that of a militant progressive fighter for his working peoples, in this case in Chiapas. Marcos clearly identifies the main enemy as "globalisation" a process of active re-division of the world where: Marcos sees during all, this an increased polarisation of the world between ultra-rich and poor. Of course he is right. The raw reality and figures behind today's world human misery, are frankly very difficult to fully comprehend: Summary: Globalization entails one single world market; enormous inter-penetration of capital; minimization of national-border interference's with trade and commerce; fostering of an indifference to national differences.; at enormous and incalculable costs to the world's working peoples.

2. Our Current Analytic Task As Marxist-Leninists

When Marxist-Leninists raise the matter of "Nationalism Today, in the era of Globalisation" - we mean the relevance of the Marxist-Leninist theory of the colonial question, and the relations between the imperialists themselves and the national liberation struggle.

Naturally the views of Dunning, Hobsbawm, Thurow upon the National Question today, stand opposed to the views of Lenin and Stalin, as stated long ago in build-up to the world of the socialist revolution in Russia that they shepherded into being. But, perhaps there have been so many changes in the world that a qualitative change has taken place to render the views of Lenin and Stalin on the importance of the National Question as being immaterial?

After all times change, and dialectical materialists recognise reality. Moreover if revolutionary socialists adopt the strategy and tactics that will further the socialist revolution and not retard it, these must be consistent with reality.

All who call themselves Marxist-Leninist accept the role of Stalin as the defender of Lenin's work. In this context, Stalin pointed out in the last work he wrote in 1951 "The Economic Problems of the USSR" that the economic positions of capitalism are constantly changing. He explicitly therefore asks whether adjustments to Lenin's and analyses are needed:

Stalin agrees that there must be a change of the assessment of capitalism. But he is talking only in terms of the relative strength of capitalism, and not about its fundamental attributes. Stalin here recognised that new conditions had placed a brake upon un-fettered capitalist development. Naturally Stalin explicitly placed this brake, in the context of the successful defense of socialism in the USSR against Hitlerite and capitalist attacks, the victory towards the peoples Democracies world wide; and the denial of markets to the world capitalists, by virtue of the link between the Peoples Democracies and the USSR: If that brake had been placed upon capitalism by the socialist system of the USSR and the development towards People's democracy, it is inevitably true that the destruction of socialism in the USSR in 1953 and the revisionist led distortions inside the People's democracies would lead to a resurgence of the capitalist system.

Returning to Stalin's lifetime, Stalin pointed out this brake on capitalist development by 1951, meant that markets would decrease and competition between capitalism would grow:

Of course this means that capitalist wars remain inevitable. While no one in their right minds would dispute that capitalist wars are inevitable nowadays, following the USA-led NATO attack upon the Balkans, there are still some who claim that significant changes have occurred to capitalism that demand a change in our overall strategy and tactics. It is our task today to begin to prepare an answer to this.

There have indeed been some significant changes since Stalin wrote the Economic Problems. We itemize some of those most important in our view:

The most important political change has been the fall of all Socialist states and their reversion to a single world market driven by profit. This has temporarily prolonged the final phases of international capitalism and imperialism both by providing a new market; but more importantly by temporarily "discrediting" Marxism-Leninism. The removal of the brake of the socialist countries, has meant a temporary revival and growth of capitalism. This has been analysed before by Bland (See "Restoration of Capitalism In the USSR"; Wembley 1984; see also web site of Alliance for the whole book at: GO TO SUBJECT INDEX ).

The advent of new technology, exemplified by the computer. These new technologies have transformed both the role of "financial capital" and that of "industrial capital". In financial capital their impact has been to dramatically expand the role of money and what is considered as "money". In industrial capital they have tremendously accelerated the rate of exploitation of workers; accelerated the flooding of markets with goods chasing buyers; by virtue of the cost of computer aided systems dramatically enhanced the rate of the fall of profit predicted by Marx. (these events have all been analysed in some detail by Alliance in :"Number 3: Protectionism, Inflation & Free Trade. Economics of the 20th Century"; Toronto 1993; Also on the web site of Alliance: See Inflation in subject index at:   GO TO SUBJECT INDEX ).
The transformation of overt naked colonialism into disguised neo-colonialism. (A neo-colony ie. a former colony which has become nominally "independent" but which continues to have its economic system largely controlled for the benefit of the ruling class of the same dominating Great Power which formerly ruled it directly). This has led to at least three specific changes. Firstly is the dispersal of industrial localization to the periphery with a consequent rise in unemployment in the former Western industrialized countries and the dramatic fall in their industrialized bases in terms of plants actually operating on their "home" territory. Secondly it has resulted in the evolution of some industrial competitors usually termed Newly Industrialised Countries (NIC). These weak though they might be, and though they might initially start under the control of foreign imperialism, they end up offering some potential or actual competition to the giants of the so-called Triad (The USA, the European powers of the European Economic Community EEC); and Japan. In combination with (ii) above, the inevitable consequence has been to accelerate the general crisis of over-production. Thirdly, in association with (ii) above, there has been a progressive NARROWING of the space (or as Lenin termed it "There is no Chinese wall between the first and the second stage of the revolutions") between the first democratic stage of the colonial revolution and the second socialist stage. This has NOT eliminated the need for the first stage in many neo-colonial countries, but it has made the allies of the working class and the peasantry the national bourgeois even more weak-willed and vacillating than before. (Alliance has discussed these issues in some detail, before in issue 29 & 5 in particular. For issue 5 entitled: The Role Of The Bourgeoisie In Colonial Type Countries - What Is The Class Character Of The Indian State ?" See:

http://www.lueneburg.net/privatseiten/Eggers_Wolfgang/eng/alliance5.htm
For Issue 28 entitled : Upon The Polemic Between Proletarian Path & Revolutionary Democracy - Concerning The Stage Of The Indian Revolution. See:

http://www.lueneburg.net/privatseiten/Eggers_Wolfgang/eng/alliance28.htm

See also Alliance on Lenin and Stalin's views on the Chinese revolution" - on the web at:(See under China at GO TO SUBJECT INDEX)

But we will argue that none of these has fundamentally changed either the nature of capitalism or the general picture of world imperialism and its need to dominate smaller economies of independent nations.

Summary: In 1951 Stalin had identified that the changes associated with socialist development in the USSR and its leadership of the People's "Democracies" had retarded the progress of capitalism. It is natural that the demise of socialism has led to its changes on the function of capital. Other major political changes over this period include the development of the NIC's and the transformation of naked colonialism into disguised neo-colonialism. Finally some major technological advances related to the computer industry has taken place.

3. Has Capitalism Fundamentally Changed Up to 1951?

Granted these dramatic changes have taken place, it is our purpose in assessing the impact of these changes. But in trying to assess these changes and their impact upon our revolutionary strategy, it might help to ask:

"What is the basic law of capital?" - and then to ask: "Whether the basic law of capitalism has changed?"

Stalin asked this question in 1951. Of course Stalin's main intent was to compare and contrast the economic laws under socialism in the USSR, with those of capitalism. (Other intents included the fighting of internal revisionism in the USSR as led by Khruschev and Vosnosenksy. The Communist League (UK) has dealt with these matters in separate publications: (Reprinted by Alliance as Issue 17: "On Revisionist Economics"; Toronto 1995; See also 'Varga & Vosnosensky at GO TO SUBJECT INDEX web site Alliance).

But there is good reason for us now, to re-consider Stalin's views on the essential laws of capitalism with respect to the current views on capitalism in the era of "globalisation". After all Stalin reasoned that it was important to explain capitalism's functioning. This is no less true today. As Stalin pointed out:
 

Before re-examining Stalin's views, it should be remind ourselves that indeed Stalin made the observation that Lenin's and Stalin's estimations of the stage of capitalism's expansion in 1915 and 1930, needed to be revised in 1951 (See above). But at no time did he challenge the characterization of capitalism as being "monopoly capitalism". To the contrary Stalin constantly in his writing of "Economic Problems Of Socialism In The USSR", identifies "modern capitalism" with "Monopoly capitalism". In the following quotations we have bolded these references.

Thus Stalin at no stage gives any indication of appraising Lenin's estimation of "monopoly" capitalism as being fundamentally in need of change.

So what Laws of Capitalism did Stalin evaluate for their capacity to stand as the "basic economic law of capitalism

First he assessed whether the root economic law of capitalism was the Law of Value, and he answered it was not, nor was the "law of competition and "the law of uneven development":

Stalin then asked whether the basic law was the obtaining of the "Average rate of profit?" He answered that it was not: Stalin did identify the Law of Surplus Value as the most "appropriate to the concept of a basic economic law of capitalism". But he pointed out that this was "too general a law and does not cover the problem of the highest rate of profit the securing of which is a condition for the development of monopoly capitalism." : So what according to Stalin IS the "Basic economic law of modern capitalism"? He replies:     Alliance feels that this operating definition FULLY stands as the current operating definition of the basic economic law of capitalism and is un-necessary to modify. We argue, that if this is so, then the rest of Stalin's understanding of the connection between the stage of "modern monopoly" capitalism and the National Question remains - basically intact.

We should note the intimate connection of the National Question, the Colonial Question and the matter of "modern monopoly capitalism" - linked into one seminal analysis by Lenin, in "Imperialism the Highest Stage of Capitalism"; written in 1916.

In this regard, Stalin gives us no indication in 1951 that there is any need to break the chain of reasoning between the stage of "modern monopoly capitalism", the chase for markets and the "enslavement and plunder of colonies and backward countries":

In the light of all the general hype about the "New Age of Computers" etc; we should give some specific considerations to the matter of new technologies. There is no doubt about the important and revolutionary impact of computing science upon daily life and capitalist production. But has the advent of new technology OF ITSELF changed the situation vis-à-vis capital's functioning? Stalin would argue that even dramatic technological changes are subordinate to the operation of the fundamental basic economic law of capital: The securing of the highest profit levels: We will argue below that the advent of computerisation has simply exacerbated the impact of Lenin's analysis, and that it has not fundamentally changed the relationship between the dependent countries and the large metropolitan blocks.

All this must lead us to considering the economic forces described by Lenin in "Imperialism - The Highest Stage of Capitalism", written in. Have there been such critical economic changes since Lenin described the features of the "highest stage of capitalism", as being imperialism in his classic work, as to lead us to need to revise his thoughts?

Summary: Up to 1951, there was no essential change in the operation of "modern monopoly" capitalism, that operated out of the necessity to extract the highest possible rate of profit and which impelled it to predatory wars and enslavements of dependent countries. The essential basic economic law underlying its development, seems to Alliance NOT to have changed since 1951.

5. Lenin's "Imperialism As the Highest Stage of Capitalism".

Lenin defined imperialism as a very specific stage where the earlier stages of capitalism were being mutated into their opposite. By this he meant that a marked feature of capitalist development is "free competition" and individual enterprise. This was being turned into its opposite cartelisation and monopoly:

In the same section, Lenin distills the key features of imperialism:
  We propose here to consider whether any of these "basic features" identified by Lenin, have changed to such a qualitative degree, that we would agree that "globalisation" is a distinctly new phase in capitalist development and mandates a different strategy and tactics for the proletariat and peasant working masses of the world.

The concentration of production and capital has developed to such a stage that it has created monopolies which play a decisive role in economic life;

Lenin pointed out that the vast scale of company mergers challenged the state.

This process has vastly accelerated. Even by 1951, Stalin was already commenting that this feature of modern monopoly capitalism was far more pervasive than it had been before. He proposed that the term "coalescence" was now superseded by the term "subjugation of the state machine to the monopolies":

But nowadays, the process is even more highly concentrated leading to vast giants of corporations. The same Le Monde editorialist notes that the types of mergers now taking place go beyond the previous seen, in another way: They include areas that until now were the sacrosanct purview of Government such as in the auto industry: In this process nothing is "off-limits", and the signal for all this was the advent of the de-nationalizing of key sectors of the British Industrial heights. This socially destructive process now is dignified and known by the name of "privatisation", and was initiated by Thatcher: What explains this current super fervor of mergers? Some of the same factors identified earlier play in, such as the vast amount of money and credit expansion: But more mundane factors are also involved such as competition, securing of research & development (R &D) gains of competitors, and job cutting: In Summary: We do not feel that this part of Lenin's definition of imperialist monopoly capital has changed.

2) The merging of bank capital with industrial capital and the creation on the basis of this "finance capital", of a financial oligarchy.

Lenin identified that :

But Lenin emphasised that, despite merging of bank and industrial capital in imperialism, this stage brings about an increasing separation between industry and its main sources of financial investment, and an increasing dependence of the former upon the latter : In the same work, Lenin drew attention to the: But there have been several changes in the nature of the alliance between the wings of capital within one nation.
For an interim period the Banks were not the prime source of finance for capitalist industry. In Britain for example, banks (mainly merchant banks) own only: Furthermore, banks in Britain provide only 6% of the external funding of industry in the form of loans and these have been traditionally short term loans to provide: Industry itself began to finance much of its own investments. The huge multi-nationals had such currency reserves that they eroded the power of the banks to some extent: These divisions between the wings of capital are recognised overtly by the business community. Thus when the U.S. Democrats were resistant to a monetary policy, preferring to have their own representative, an industrialist Mr. G.William Millar at the Federal Reserve Board "was seen by many within and outside the Federal Reserve System as being too closely tied to President Carter and insufficiently attuned to the needs of the financial sector, was replaced by Paul Volcker. As the Wall Street Journal later reported it: In fact the relation between the profits of the financial capitalist class, and the industrial capitalist class are inversely related. This can be seen for the USA in the accompanying graph, on Graph 1.

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GRAPH: PROFITS OF NON-FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL BANK CAPITAL USA 1973-1984 Inflation adjusted.

From: "Federal Reserve behaviour and the limits of monetary policy in the current economic crisis".G.Epstein p.253. In: " The Imperilled Economy " New York. 1987.

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 We have discussed these matters before, in Alliance 3, referenced above. But as Lenin pointed out, "history moves in zig-zags":

It should not be surprising therefore if there has been another change.
The relationship between Finance and industrial capital, did indeed go through "a divorce", as first identified by Comrades of the Communist League. The Communist League and we have described this before in relation to the war between "monetarist" economists and their political representatives and the "Keynsian-laissez-faire" capitalism and their political and economic representatives.

However, the situation has again changed such that the enormous funds available from the explosion of the new forms of money and new computerized forms of "money trading" have fostered a new re-marriage between finance and commodity-industrial capitalism:

In Summary: We do not feel that this part of Lenin's definition of imperialist monopoly capital has changed.

 3) The export of capital as distinguished from the export of commodities acquires exceptional importance;

In essence this has not changed in importance, But we feel that certain new elements should be considered
i) New Forms of Money and Credit
The advent of new technology from computerisation has meant the increase in rapid fluxes of "hot money" around the world in search of a profit. As Alliance 3 pointed out; the total amount of monies in the market place has rapidly increased. This led to the new markets of money trading. This in turn led to the further and new way of eroding the "national" policy decision-making capacity of any dependent nation. Thus we have seen the major crises initiated by single traders such as the rogue trader from Barings recently. The financial attacks on the currencies of many of the Asian countries show the depth of attack:

Lately this has become so potentially destablising that the more far seeing captislast have recongised the need to put some sort of currency controls back on the agenda. This includes those like George Soros whose fortunes to large part are built on these very predatory tactics that he now condemns. Says the Multinational Monitor: ii) The Transfer of Export Capacity of Industrial Goods
In fact the imperialist metropolitan country bourgeoisie have utilized the various national bourgeoisie of the developing countries, to foster the growth of certain types of industry in those countries. This ahs allowed them to off-load certain more ecologically damaging industries to the more distant areas of the world; and utilize the lower cost of labour power to accrue further profit. They have been assisted by "bad loans" made both by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and by banks who essentially know that their loans will be "covered" by governmental agencies of the metropolitan world in the case of a default by the developing country: iii) The Direction of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)

It is of interest that there ahs been a major change in the targets of FDI (i.e. capital exports). Whilst in 1915 the target was mainly the colonies, even then Lenin identified that the imperialist were interested in any geographical area of potential profit. Thus Lenin ridiculed Kautsky's view that the essence of imperialism was that of an exploitation of rural areas:

In this regard, there have been two changes:

One is the decline in capital exports from the United Kingdom; but this is entirely consistent with the British decline as an imperialist power.
This is Lenin's law of "uneven development" i.e. swings in fortunes of different imperialisms.

But Secondly, the destination of much capital export has also changed. Much more than before it now flows towards the developed world:

Furthermore as Graph 2: below shows, outward and inward flows of FDI (Capital exports) to the USA either favoured the outward direction, or were balanced on the whole - over the period 1970-1993 (Data from UNCTAD cited by Dunning Ibid; p. 307).

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Graph 2: In hard copy only.

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The reasons for this change of direction from colonial to developed country reflects several factors including A need to obtain higher research & Development; a need to obtain new markets; a need to incapacitate foreign competition. None of it ever did away with a continuing export of capital to the under-developed neo-colonies.

In Summary: We do not feel that this part of Lenin's definition of imperialist monopoly capital has changed.

(4) the formation of international monopolist capitals associations which share the world among themselves,
We have already dealt with this under 5.(1) above.

(5) The territorial division of the whole world among the biggest capitalist powers is completed."

It must be quickly acknowledged that this has not only not changed since Lenin's day, but the operation of this colonialisation has if anything become even more intense.

The inevitable war for markets between the dominant imperialisms continue. Today, this competition has become even much more intense, than in Lenin's day. The formation of huge trading blocks, of which the most obvious examples are: NAFTA; EEC; ASEAN.

Jaques Attali (former and Founding head of the European Bank for Reconstruction & Development) puts it this way:

 In Summary: We do not feel that this part of Lenin's definition of imperialist monopoly capital has changed

Overall Summary To Part 5:

We are forced to conclude that there has been no QUALITATIVE change in Lenin's working definitions. We note only an EXACERBATION of ALL of the underlying tendencies to:

A crisis of over-production; an increasing

rate of exploitation; a decreasing rate of profit; a drive to further fights over markets; and an increasing need to subjugate dependent countries by imperialist capital.

The OBJECTIVE corollaries are that revolution is even more inevitable and even more needed to resolve the underlying contradictions of an increased socialized mode of production owned by a small, private and exclusively small coterie of profiteers.

OBJECTIVELY, the role of the National Question remains important, but the role of the national bourgeois and its ability to fight against foreign capital is ever decreasing. That OBJECTIVELY means that the working class and peasantry have even greater responsibility to ensure they capture the leadership of national struggles as in East Timor, Kosova etc.

But - This is only hindered by the SUBJECTIVE weaknesses of the revolutionary movements and the lack of a unitary Marxist-Leninist party in each country.

6. Increasing Economic Crisis

We pointed out in Alliance 3, that neither Keynsian economics nor monetarist economics could solve the capitalist problem, Keynsian economics led to "cheapening" of money by inflation and depressed profits of the financiers.

Monetarism depressed the profits of industrialists and led to unemployment.

The capitalist system continues to lurch from crisis to crisis:

The Great Surge in the markets is clearly a part of a "bubble economy"; as even very recent scares revealed: There is also a great over-production of goods with the inevitable anarchic glut of goods amidst increasing poverty, that is characteristic of the capitalist systems.

7. What This Means for The National Question

We think that both the recent Asian crises and the currency manipulations in Malaysia, show the first implications for a foreign independent nation trying to stand up to foreign capital. The next stage of smashing defiance is shown by the USA_NATO led aggression in the Kosovan war and the more recent East Timor crisis and war.

Both show the Implications of globalisation for the National Question for Marxist-Leninists today.. These can be codified as below:

i) Trample national rights by both economic and currency manipulations via speculation; and denial of foreign markets for countries that stand defiant;

ii) If continued resistance to the will of the imperialist countries occurs, open invasions on the pretext of "international law and order";

iii) The resulting denial of national rights means the current (i.e. today's even in the era of so called "globalisation") validity of Lenin's original formulation regarding the strategy and tactics of the revolution in colonial type countries. These were essentially formulated at the Second Congress of Comintern. We have discussed these elsewhere in detail and their application and their revisionist distortions by Trotsky and Kussinen (See Alliance 5; Alliance 29); by Khruschev (See Alliance 25 January 1997); and by Ho Chi Minh (See Alliance 27 December 1997).

iv) Marxist-Leninists must avoid false designations of "national status" as in the so called "Black Nation" of the USA (See Alliance 23); while also avoiding support to the bleating of Nationalists of the smaller "minor" partners of capital and imperialism who while being imperialists are themselves subject to predation by bigger imperialisms (e.g. The minor partners of imperialism like the Canadian bourgeoisie etc.)

v) Marxist-Leninists must continually strive to win the leadership of the national liberation struggles that continue to break out, especially since the historical space for the progressive potential for the national bourgeoisie is ever decreasing in the era of greater inter-penetration of capitalism and imperialism.

Lenin's Differentiation of the "bourgeois-democrat" and the "nationalist-revolutionary"

In brief here, the only change made in Lenin's original Draft Theses as adopted by the Second Comintern Congress was to make clear that the working class in a colonial type country should support a bourgeois-led movement only if it was genuinely revolutionary- the term "bourgeois democratic" being replaced by the term "nationalist-revolutionary":

Lenin explained in more detail why this was needed then: Like so much of what we have discussed in this article, Lenin saw very clearly.
We submit that neither regarding Imperialism's character, nor upon the National Question is there any need to "update" (i.e. Revise) Lenin and Stalin in fundamental ways. What astonishes us is how accurately the general un-folding of imperialism in the era of "globalisation" conforms to Lenin's analyses made so long ago.

Finally, the under-developed neo-colonies have progressive forces that recognise the need for NATIONAL FORMS OF STRUGGLE:

It is the responsibility of the Marxist-Leninists to both harnesses this recognition and to enable it to fulfill its goal of liberation of the people, by utilizing the strategy and tactics of the National Liberation struggle as worked out by Lenin and Stalin.

WE MUST RE-BUILD THE MARXIST-LENINIST COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL!

"GLOBALISATION" FOR CAPITAL MANDATES REVOLUIONARY PROLETARIAN INTERNATIONALISM!

BUILD THE MARXIST-LENINIST PARTIES IN EACH COUNTRY!

October 1999.

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